Emergency Care Research Section (ECRS)

ECRS

The Emergency Care Research Section (ECRS) is dedicated fulfilling the research mission of the Division of Emergency Medicine and Washington University School of Medicine by performing high quality Emergency Care Research. Our current section members have a vast array of interests from basic science to policy based research. Several current members have successfully competed for federal funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and several have gained support from private funding agencies such as the Emergency Medicine Foundation (EMF) and the American Geriatric Society (AGS). Our long term goal is to perform high quality acute care research that contributes towards the advancement of Emergency Medicine.


Academic Productivity:

For the time period of 2008-2012, there were approximately 97 unique peer-reviewed publications authored by Emergency Medicine faculty members (articles, conferences papers, reviews and short surveys). The publications were published in over 40 different journals representing a wide variety of subject areas such as sepsis, cardiac arrest, acute stroke protocols, cerebrovascular disorders, electron microscopy, evidence-based medicine, transient ischemic attack, hematoma, congestive heart failure, lactate clearance, mixed venous oxygen saturation, quantitative resuscitation, ortho-geriatric care, delirium, drug toxicity, accidental falls, quality metrics, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, carotid endarterectomy, to name a few. Co-authors were from affiliations such as Harvard Medical School, McMaster University, Northwestern University, University of Pittsburgh, Cleveland Clinic, New York University School of Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and others.


Impact on the Field:

The 97 unique peer-reviewed publications authored by Emergency Medicine faculty members 2008-2012, have been cited 632 times as of May 2013. The citing publications were published in over 150 unique journal titles in 12 languages (English, German, French, Chinese, Spanish, Polish, Turkish, Bulgarian, Croatian, Italian, Portuguese and Russian), and authored by authors from over 50 different countries. The second generation citation count is approximately 1,750.



Individual Researcher Areas of Interest

Enyo Ama Ablordeppey, MD, MPH
Dr. Ablordeppey received her medical training at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She completed an emergency medicine residency at Washington University School of Medicine as well as fellowship training in critical care medicine and emergency ultrasound with specific concentration on point-of-care echo. Currently serving as the director of critical care ultrasound in the surgical intensive care unit, she has two areas of focus. First is bedside ultrasound education. With a team of dedicated faculty members, she developed a point-of-care critical care ultrasound-training program for critical care practitioners. Her second focus is research, both in point-of-care ultrasound applications and ultrasound education research.


Chris Carpenter, MD MSCI
My research foci are Geriatric emergencies and diagnostic science. I collaborate with many organizations to improve the emergency department management of geriatric adults, including: several Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Geriatric Task Forces; the American Geriatric Society’s (AGS) Research Agenda Setting Process; and the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Geriatric Section. My prior research topics have included diagnostics, dementia, falls prevention, and knowledge translation. I am also a nationally recognized teacher of Evidence Based Diagnostics and have taught at the McMaster Evidence Based Clinical Practice, University of California in San Francisco Evidence Based Diagnostics, and Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine.


Brian Fuller, MD
The focus of my clinical research is in studying interventions traditionally reserved for the Intensive Care Unit to a more proximal time window in disease presentation, such as the Emergency Department. Although much of our focus has been on severe sepsis and septic shock, we have begun to investigate the effects of mechanical ventilation delivered in the ED setting on clinical outcomes, specifically the development of acute lung injury. We have accrued preliminary data that suggests that tidal volume ranges delivered may be harmful in the ED setting, and may contribute to the development of ALI. We also have two ongoing trials examining neutrophilic inflammation in patients at risk for ALI development, as well as a prospective cross sectional trial involving mechanically ventilated ED patients.


Richard Griffey, MD
My operational, research and teaching interests are in the areas of quality and patient safety. I study the impact of information systems on quality and safety, implementation science and organizational performance, and evidence-based imaging and radiation safety. Current projects include an assessment of emergency physicians attitudes and preferences related to computerized imaging decision support, identification of highly imaged conditions and a prospective evaluation of providing cumulative CT study count on CT ordering in the ED. Recently I have also overseen several health literacy studies addressing screening in the ED, implications for patient outcomes and methods of intervention.


Laura Heitsch, MD
The focus of our research is acute neurologic emergencies such as ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In addition we’re interested in studying the management of stroke by EMS systems. Our current projects revolve around the management of a large database of all historical BJH stroke patients. We are also interested in process improvement using strategies from LEAN management. Our future ideas revolve around observation protocol development for transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and stroke literacy assessment.


Chris Holthaus, MD
My clinical interests reside in the Emergency Department management of the critically ill. Areas of research include sepsis, fluid optimization, and hemodynamic monitoring. I am currently the co-PI along with EM Intensivist Brian Fuller, MD for the EFFORT study (ED Flow-directed Fluid Optimization Resuscitation Trial- clintrials.gov ID: NCT01128413). The short term goal of this study is to evaluate a non-invasive approach that optimizes intravenous (IV) fluid administration according to heart performance and results in surrogate improvements in morbidity and mortality via lactate clearance. Additional objectives include comparative assessments of methods for determining volume responsiveness and establishing a prevalence of volume responsive shock in the Emergency Department (ED).

Stacey House, MD, PhD
I use genetic manipulation of FGF ligands and receptors in a clinically-relevant mouse model of acute myocardial infarction to understand how we might manipulate FGF signaling to improve both acute injury (cardiac function, cell death, inflammation) and chronic aspects of remodeling (fibrosis, hypertrophy, infarct size, vascular remodeling). I am also testing delivery of human recombinant FGF2 isoforms during early reperfusion injury (to mimic how they may eventually be used clinically) to provide cardioprotection. I am also interested in the use of FGF signaling to enhance the regenerative capacity of cardiomyocytes.


Lawrence M. Lewis, MD
My clinical interests include traumatic brain injury, asthma/angioedema, and health policy. I am currently the PI on A PROSPECTIVE CLINICAL EVALUATION OF BIOMARKERS OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (ALERT-TBI) study which evaluates the usefulness of various biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of TBI. Students involved in this research will help identify potential study subjects, and participate in sample processing and neuro-cognitive testing. I am also involved in a health policy proposal which will attempt to identify demographic and clinical characteristics of heavy users of local and regional healthcare-related services, and propose interventions to reduce their healthcare utilization while maintaining or improving their overall health status.


Stephen Y. Liang, MD
My research interests include infection prevention in emergency care settings (both emergency department and pre-hospital) and trauma-related infections. Specifically, I am in the process of looking at ways to improve ED adherence to evidence-based infection prevention strategies (e.g., hand hygiene, isolation, protective equipment use). I am also using hospital and national databases to look at infectious disease outcomes in patients after orthopedic trauma.


Tiffany M. Osborn, MD
Tiffany Osborn holds a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Biology with a minor in Chemistry from University of Houston in Houston, Texas. She earned her medical degree from University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas prior to completing an Emergency Medicine residency at University of Maryland Medical System in Baltimore, Maryland. In 2002, with less than 50 documented EM physicians nation wide having completed critical care training, she finished a two-year Trauma and Surgical Critical Care fellowship at R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Afterwards, Dr. Osborn joined the faculty of the University of Virginia Health Systems in Charlottesville, Virginia working both in EM and Critical Care. She earned her Master’s in Public Health degree at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London, England in 2009.


Peter Panagos, MD
The focus of our research is acute neurologic emergencies such as ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In addition we’re interested in studying the management of stroke by EMS systems. Our current projects revolve around the management of a large database of all historical BJH stroke patients. We are also interested in process improvement using strategies from LEAN management. Our future ideas revolve around observation protocol development for transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) and stroke literacy assessment.


Daniel Theodoro MD, MSCI
I am a patient safety and quality researcher that focuses on the impact of new technology on Emeregency Department (ED) procedures. My current focus is using large administrative databases to assess the impact of central venous catheters, and their complications, in the ED. My other areas of study is currently the impact of ultrasound technology on predicting the outcome of cardiac arrests. Lastly, I have an interest in examining the role of medical simulators in improving patient safety.

Contact Us
sarah.pruett@wustl.edu
Follow Us:     
Everyday EBM   
P: (314) 747-4156
F: (314) 362-0478
Make a Gift
EM Statistics
Adult ED Visits: 95,600
Pediatric ED Visits: 50,000
Trauma Center: Level 1
Residency Type: 1-4
Fellowship Programs: 5
FT Faculty: 40
Residents: 48